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Folks who’ve read ALL MY LIFE will get this…

(In ALL MY LIFE the protagonist, Kari, deals with a similar issue. Only in Kari’s case, it’s not just revenge posting…it’s also blackmail.)

Victims Push Laws to End Online Revenge Posts

Marianna Taschinger, 23, in Groves, Tex., is suing her ex-boyfriend and a Web site known for “revenge porn” where nude photographs of her were posted.

Marianna Taschinger, 23, in Groves, Tex., is suing her ex-boyfriend and a Web site known for “revenge porn” where nude photographs of her were posted. SOURCE: NEW YORK TIMES

He was a muscular guy with “kind of a nerdy kind of charm,” Marianna Taschinger recalled, a combination that proved irresistible to an 18-year-old girl in a small Texas town.

They dated, broke up, dated again. He asked her to pick out a wedding ring. He also made another request — that she take nude pictures of herself and send them to him.

“He said if I didn’t want to send them to him, that meant that I didn’t trust him, which meant that I didn’t love him,” Ms. Taschinger said.

The photos would never be shared with anyone else, she remembers him promising. And she believed him — until last December, more than a year after the couple broke up, when a dozen nude images of her popped up on a Web site focusing on what has become known as revenge porn. She is suing the site and her ex-boyfriend.

Revenge porn sites feature explicit photos posted by ex-boyfriends, ex-husbands and ex-lovers, often accompanied by disparaging descriptions and identifying details, like where the women live and work, as well as links to their Facebook pages. The sites, which are proliferating, are largely immune to criminal pursuit. But that may be changing. California lawmakers this month passed the first law aimed at revenge porn sites.

With cellphone cameras ubiquitous and many Americans giving in to the urge to document even the most intimate aspects of their lives, revenge porn has opened up new ways to wreak vengeance.

The effects can be devastating. Victims say they have lost jobs, been approached in stores by strangers who recognized their photographs, and watched close friendships and family relationships dissolve. Some have changed their names or altered their appearance………………

…….“It’s just an easy way to make people unemployable, undatable and potentially at physical risk,” said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland, who is writing a book on online harassment…….

……….Professor Franks said that opposition to legislation often stems from a blame-the-victim attitude that holds women responsible for allowing photographs to be taken in the first place, an attitude similar in her view to blaming rape victims for what they wear or where they walk.

“The moment the story is that she voluntarily gave this to her boyfriend, all the sympathy disappears,” she said…….

READ THE FULL STORY HERE : NEW YORK TIMES

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